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Space Shuttle, Columbia (STS-28) and Space Shuttle, Discovery (STS-48) Insignias | Purdue University Libraries, Archives and Special Collections

Name: Space Shuttle, Columbia (STS-28) and Space Shuttle, Discovery (STS-48) Insignias


Historical Note:

History of Thirtieth Flight of the Space Shuttle, Columbia (STS-28) and Forty-Third Flight of the Space Shuttle, Discovery (STS-48) Insignias

Launching from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Columbia completed 80 orbits, traveling 2.1 million nautical miles before landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California.  The flight took place August 8-13, 1989.  It was the fourth shuttle mission dedicated to the United States Department of Defense purposes and the 8th flight of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

The insignia was designed by the crew, who said it portrays the pride the American people have in their manned spaceflight program.  It depicts America (the eagle) guiding the space program (the space shuttle) safely home from an orbital mission. The view looks south on Baja California and the west coast of the United States as the space travelers reenter the atmosphere.  The American flag is represented by the hypersonic contrails created by the eagle and shuttle.  The crew called the simple boldness of the design symbolic of American's unfaltering commitment to leadership in the exploration and development of space.

The crew for STS-28 were: Commander, Brewster H. Shaw; Pilot, Richard N. Richards; Mission Specialists, David C. Leetsma, James C. Adamson and Mark N. Brown.

Launching from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Discovery completed 81 orbits, traveling 1.9 million nautical miles before landing on Runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, California.  The primary payload was the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite.

Designed by the astronaut crewmembers, the STS-48 insignia represents the space shuttle Discovery in orbit about the Earth after deploying the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) depicted in block letter style.  The stars are those in the northern hemisphere as seen in the fall and winter when UARS will begin its study of Earth's atmosphere.  The color bands on Earth's horizon, extending up to the UARS spacecraft, depict the study of Earth's atmosphere.  The triangular shape represents the relationship among the three atmospheric processes that determine upper atmospheric structure and behavior: chemistry, dynamics, and energy. In the words of the crew members, "This continuous process brings life to our planet and makes our planet unique in the solar system."

The crew for this flight were: Commander, Navy Captain, John Creighton; pilot, Navy Commander, Ken Reightler.  Mission Specialists were Marine Corps Colonel Jim Buchli, Army Lieutenant Colonel Sam Gemar and Air Force Colonel Mark Brown.

Sources: Information gathered from the letters of authenticity and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Press Kits for STS-28 and STS-48.





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